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bronzeagepirate 2 points ago +2 / -0

When first responders were trying to get to an assault victim, who had a broken cheek, missing teeth and was knocked unconscious, they had a tough time.

An internal Minneapolis Police Department report obtained by KSTP said, “The crowd from the George Floyd Memorial began moving toward us and people were hollering that they were going to kick our asses and that we would have to kill them.”

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bronzeagepirate 1 point ago +1 / -0

All of the money we get from the government goes to A

All of the our other money goes to B

Siphons tons of money back in to the government.

Yeah it's different.

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bronzeagepirate 2 points ago +2 / -0

Their favorite time to try and make all of their virtuous statements is in a scenario where they are least likely to be called out. Notice how it gets more and more absurd with every next comment she makes?

"but i should not be talking politics here" hue hue but i did assuming EVERYONE AGREES WITH ME OR ELSE THEY ARE RACISTS

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bronzeagepirate 1 point ago +1 / -0

This is probably my favorite of the dozen.

Soros and his organizations spent $1.7 million to help get Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner elected in 2018. Before being elected, Krasner earned a name for himself by suing the Philadelphia Police Department 75 times. Since he took office, dozens of experienced prosecutors have either been fired or resigned. Criminal prosecutions have plummeted and crime has risen. Philadelphia now has the second-highest murder rate among large cities in the country.

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bronzeagepirate 2 points ago +2 / -0

In February 2009, Ontario passed its Green Energy Act (GEA). It was signed a week after Obama’s Economic Recovery and Reinvestment Act in the US, following several months of slow and arduous negotiations.

This was the plan: increased integration of wind and solar energy into Ontario’s electricity grid would shut down coal plants and create 50,000 green jobs in the first three years alone.

Additionally, First Nations communities would manage their own electricity supply and distribution – what observers would later call the ‘decolonization’ of energy – empowering Canada’s indigenous communities who had been disenfranchised by historical trauma.

Lawmakers promised that clean and sustainable energy provided by renewables would also reduce costs for poorer citizens.

But on 1 January 2019, Ontario repealed the GEA, one month before its 10th anniversary. The 50,000 guaranteed jobs never materialized. The ‘decolonization’ of energy didn’t work out, either.

By 2015, Ontario’s auditor general, Bonnie Lysyk, concluded that citizens had paid ‘a total of $37 billion’ above the market rate for energy.

In April this year, the market value for all wind-generated electricity in Ontario was only $4.3 million. Yet Ontario paid out $184.5million in wind contracts.